Thank You India – A Series of Observations #2: Moguls, Marriage & Like Sugar in Milk

The word “mogul” comes from “Mughal:” A person of Persian-Indian heritage who has achieved a certain level of success and wealth. One of the financial planners I met in India explained that when the Persians came to India, the Indian ruler asked how they planned to blend in with their culture, how they’d find room to live in a country already over- populated. The Persian ruler explained they’d fit and blend in “Like sugar and milk.” How sweet (literally) is that?

Tangent warning:

I heard some commentary on a Catholic radio station about the “Marry yourself” concept. It was deemed yet another way to put your needs and desires above others when, in the best form, marriage is means of choosing to put your loved one’s needs and desires above your own. Certainly not to the point of neglecting yourself, but as a way of showing love.

A woman called in to the show and said that, indeed, the word “marry” (even in cooking) indicates the combining of two (or more) ingredients; a blending of two to create a different third. This combinating, of marrying two different ways, is the creative process. You cannot create with only one ingredient.

Most of the great sites we saw in India are the result of this sweet Persian-Indian relationship. The architecture of Jama Masjid the great mosque, the Taj Mahal and the Agra Fort is all Mughal-inspired.Jama MasjidAgra FortTaj Mahal

What I suspect most people don’t know is that the Taj Mahal is a tomb, a shrine for the love Shah Jehan had for his beloved queen Mumtaz Mahal, who died giving birth to their 14th child. Taj means “crown.”

It took 22,000 craftmen 22 years to construct the Taj Mahal. Indeed, it’s white marble is like milk with sugar.  As I gazed upon the beauty and grandeur of the Taj Mahal, and wept, it occurred to me that we marvel at the wealth required to create such an awe-inspiring structure.
But what we must also marvel at is the wealth that provided 22,000 families with income for 22 years because their husbands/fathers/brothers/sons were craftsmen there.

Our group learned about Mukesh Ambani, a billionare from the oil and gas industry and one of the world’s wealthiest men. While business conditions may have been more favorable elsewhere, Ambani chose to keep his business in India to provide employment for his fellow Indians. Here is a photo of his home, Antilia, in Mumbai. Antilia, the home of Mukesh Ambani

“It is not how much one makes but to what purpose one spends.” – John Ruskin.

About Amy Jo Lauber

I help people who are overwhelmed take control & make good financial decisions with confidence and experience peace and abundance. Are you ready to say goodbye to working hard but not having anything to show for it? Go to www.lauberfinancialplanning.com "Let's Talk" tab to schedule your complimentary initial consultation and take the first step on the path to financial empowerment.
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4 Responses to Thank You India – A Series of Observations #2: Moguls, Marriage & Like Sugar in Milk

  1. John Armesto says:

    I saw an interview of the CEO for Starbucks yesterday. They already provide healthcare for their people who work 20 hours or more. His attitude was that they put their people first, giving everyone the opportunity to participate in profit sharing as a way to provide the best in customer service. What a positive work and financial environment for other employers to strive for. Mukesh Ambani obviously understands this. I plan to buy some stock.

  2. Amy Jo, great insight into the employment and financial security that building that incredible structure provided. Didn’t think about that until you mentioned it.

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